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foreign- policy issues, we have moved our agenda and are focused on things domestic. we want to do a report on education. we do not want to repeat what everyone else has done. we want to look at education to the filter of national security and ask the question, what is the relationship between the challenges of k-12 education and the national security of the united states? it did not turn out to be a terribly hard selll. first she cursed me because she knew i had at that point. she was there. she and joel co-chaired this task force report, our version of the commission. the idea was to take people with disparate backgrounds, educators, people do not often come together in the same space, and essentially raise the question about what is the relationship between the educational challenges we face in the national security challenges we face? to recsast this issue. the fact that you are here reflects the fact that you are here at the risk of being redundant and redundant. what we wanted to do is get people who read foreign affairs rather than the chronicle of higher education. and jour
spoke thursday about the future of u.s. foreign policy. the syrian civil war, and other challenges facing the middle east. this came at a forum hosted by "foreign-policy" magazine. she also answer questions. this is an hour. [applause] >> madam secretary, today we solve all your problems. nothing left to worry about, really. actually, the office of policy planning and the foreign policy group made a bet we could bring together leaders from inside government from leaders outside government to have a real discussion about the future of american foreign policy. is there to say based on the conversation we had today that that has paid off. that is especially thanks to say paanalysts and participants to mid really impressive than insightful interventions over the course of the day. i also want to give a special thank you to people at the foreign-policy group and policy planning office, who were the heart and soul of putting today together. if you've given a quick round of applause. -- you could give them a quick round of applause. [applause] we made a second bet that david could shine a
in every debate -- even the foreign policy debate. the american people are on the side of the president and democrats who are making this case. that is not to say that there should not be spending as part as this debate. there has been over $1 trillion in spending cuts. that is a part of this debate that gets lost. just because washington has a short memory does not mean we should all have one and that there has already been sacrifice on behalf of the american people through those domestic discretionary cuts. we are excited. c.a.p. has been a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we have talked about medicare savings that can improve and strengthen the program and address rising national health expenditures. we will have more to say on the issue of taxes. we are ecstatic to have senator durbin here today, who has played a fundamental role over the last several years. he has been part of every negotiation that has taken place. he is still an optimist. that is a sign of progress. he has had a long history of being a champion and advocate for the middle class. he has carried that advocacy in th
on this, she will eventually be forced to relent. she does not have the experience on foreign policy. host: in this wall street journal era, it says the administration may have erred. there are different ways of treating the politics on doing that. you could argue that going in preemptively was a better course in some respects. the idea of a susan rice nomination is still something of a trial balloon, because the president has not said definitively that he wants to make her secretary of state. so this was sort of testing period to see if she could survive. at the same time, no one in the white house has denied that she is his favorite candidate. it could have gone on either way, frankly, yesterday, or at some point after he had already nominated her. host: newspapers are reporting susan rice will be meeting with susan collins of maine and senator bob corker of tennessee, who is in line to be the ranking republican on the senate foreign relations committee, which will hold confirmation hearings for secretary of state nominees. these three republicans would need more republicans to come to t
, a centrist on foreign policy has expressed support for some of the obama administrations recent national security policy. again, that's from the hill reporting on foreign policy magazine's article yesterday. now, this is from the washington times this morning. hill panels play musical chairs, this is about the new chairs of the house committees in the house of representatives, and from yesterday's newspaper, the hill, gmple o.p. women press boehner for top committee spots. this is molly hooper's article. molly hooper reports on the leadership in congress for the hill newspaper. molly, who are some of the new chairs? caller: well, the new chairs happen to mostly be men. in fact, they're all men, with the exception of two open spots that have yet to be assigned by speaker boehner. but we're basically going to see a lot of the old faces. there's seven committees have new chairman this year, or will in the next congress. you'll be seeing a conservative republican from texas, atop financial services. ed royce, california republican of foreign affairs. representative mike mccall, texas republi
that a higher priority in your own foreign policy? >> the short answer would be yes. all those countries that you have listed, and more, certainly in terms of their economic capacity, compared to some of the smaller democracies, particularly some in the americas that have a long history of embracing democratic values, but they would not have the bankroll, if you will, to participate in international missions. again i, i keep using afghanistan as a touchstone, but there are 40 countries with boots on the ground. there are more than 60 that contribute on the development side. japan now, sweden. some of those democracies that are really in making a remarkable difference in the day-to-day lives of afghans. there are many ways where democracy can help spread democracy, which i think is a worthwhile endeavor and we would agree. there are different ways in which can engage non-militarily that are arguably going to have a much needed defect in parts of the world right now. in some of these troubled areas, it is clearly at a to pinpoint where development is not the issue. >> but someone has to pr
. that is the bipartisan tradition we need more of in washington, especially on foreign policy. as you prepare to leave the senate you love, i think i speak on behalf of everybody here and millions of people across the country when i say your legacy will endure in a safer and more secure world and a safer and more secure america. we pray this nation produces more leaders with your sense of decency and stability and integrity. we are grateful to you. thank you very much. [applause] i will point out it was the coup took me on my first foreign trip as a senator to russia, ukraine, and we were there to see the cooperative production program in action. the first thing i learned is when dick travels overseas, it is not a duncan. -- junkin. we did not stop and look at beautiful sights and lounge around. he wore out every 25-year-old staffoer. what you also learn is dick -- the more remote a place is, the more obscure the facility is, the bigger a rock star dick is. [laughter] they love him. i remember walking through one facility. i leaned in for a closer look. they said, do not touch that orange stuff. at an
life-saving assistance, whether they support children, strengthen food security or advance u.s. foreign policy. we also consider operational issues including efficient management and oversight. this case by case analysis ensures that there is careful consideration of the context surrounding a proposed activity. before the coup, usaid was the largest donor supporting leches in mali. programs trained poll workers and improved elections monitoring systems, strengthened political parties and provided voter education. when the electoral support activities resumed, providing the consent of congress, it will help support free an fair elections in mali and a peaceful political exit from the current situation. a key issue will be ensuring the inclusion and participation of the internally displaced personals and refugees in the political process. we plan to expand our elections assistance programming to include broader civic engagement activities, to support national reconciliation as part of the return to an inclusive democratic maliian society. the only usaid supported economic growth activitie
-service tonight here on c-span. next, the israeli foreign minister talks about the impediments to peace in the region. speaking from the saban center for middle east policy, this is about an hour. >> we meet at a time of great turmoil and the middle east. just after the presidential election and the united states. two weeks ago, we were looking at the prospect of canceling the forum because of the war that was going on with hamas and gaza. thankfully, calm has been restored. hopefully it is a lasting calm. every day brings dramatic news from the middle east. yesterday, the plo won recognition as a non-member observer state. egyptians were in the street demonstrating against their newly elected muslim brotherhood president's latest decrees. this evening, the governor of israel announced 3000 new settlements. how is the united states and israel to cope with all of these dramatic developments? how is the united states and israel to deal with the ongoing revolutions customer the descent into chaos and syria, the growing divide that is spreading across the arab world and the broader middle e
in driving our nation's economy. unfortunately, current immigration policies are preventing american businesses from hiring foreign students who earn advanced degrees in approximate science, technology, engineering and mathematics from our best universities. from growing startups to u.s. multinationals, american employers are desperate for qualified stem workers no matter where they're from. microsoft, for example, has over 6,000 job openings waiting to be filled by scientists, researchers, engineers and developers. for now these openings and many others will remain vacant because too few american students are graduating with stem degrees and foreign stem graduates can't get the visas they need. every year the u.s. invests in educating thousands of foreign students in stem fields at our top universities only to send them back to compete against us. chairman lamar smith, along with congressman raul labrador, congressman bob goodlatte, and of course, the gentleman from california, mr. issa, have all worked on this and we have now put forward the measure before us to spur job creation b
of cybersecurity executive orders here at home may be cited back to us by some foreign nations, with them accusing us of telling them to do as we say, but not as we do. historical hands off regulatory policy has allowed the internet to become the greatest vehicle for global, social, and economic liberty since the printing press. despite the current economic climate, it continues to grow at an astonishing pace. the f.c.c. commissioner and are in dubai this week as u.s. delegates, our committee has also sent representatives from both parties to keep an eye on the proceedings. they are the 193 member countries of the united nations are gathered to consider whether to apply to the internet a regulatory regime that the internet telecommunications union created in the 1980's for old-fashioned telephone service. as well as whether to swallow the internet's nongovernmental organizational structure whole and make it part of the united nations. neither of these are acceptable outcomes and must be strongly opposed by our delegation. among those supportive of such regulation is russian president putin who spo
as chairman of the judiciary committee subcommittee on immigration policy and enforcement. he understands the nuances of our legal immigration system and the vital importance of secure borders, especially as it relates to his role as vice chairman of the foreign awares -- affairs committee he brought a unique perspective to the foreign affairs committee, having served eight years on the permanent select committee on intelligence, and counterintelligence subcommittee. in the aftermath of september 11, congressman fwalingly tchared subcommittee on internal -- international, excuse me, terrorism nonproliferation and human rights and held one of the first hearings on the 9/11 commission's recommendations, a hearing that led to more than 10 provisions that were included in the final bill. congressman gallegly's long, distinguished career has been supported by the love and support of his wife janis and their four children and 10 grarne. congressman gallegly's dedication to our national security, strong borders, legal immigration, has contribute immensely to the betterment of our nation and we c
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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